Ptelea trifoliata
Common name: 
Hoptree
Wafer-ash
Sinking-ash
Water-ash
Pronunciation: 
TE-le-a tri-fo-li-A-ta
Family: 
Rutaceae
Genus: 
Type: 
Broadleaf
Native to (or naturalized in) Oregon: 
No
  • Broadleaf deciduous, shrub or low branched small tree, rounded, 15-20 ft (4.5-6 m) high, similar width.  Leaves alternate, compound (trifoliate, i.e., 3-leaflets), 6-10 cm long, leaflets ovate to elliptical-oblong, narrowed at both ends, middle leaf largest, glossy dark green above, and glabrous below, many tiny translucent dots (glands) can be seen by holding the leaf against a strong light, strong citrus odor were crushed; petiole 7-10 cm long.  Flowers are small (8-12 mm diam.), white-green, in terminal clusters (cymes), appear in late spring but are not very showy.  Carrion flies pollinate the flowers.  Fruit nearly circular, winged, 1.5-2.5 cm wide, brown at maturity.
  • Sun to heavy shade.  Very adaptable, but best in well-drained soil.
  • Hardy to USDA Zone 3       Native range from Ontario to New York, south to Florida, and west to Minnesota.
  • Several subspecies are recognized: P. t. ssp. angustifolia, P. t. ssp. pallida, and P. t. ssp. polyadenia
  • Ptelea: Greek for Elm, the fruit is similar; trifoliata: tri, three, folium, leaf, referring to the three leaflets.
  • Hoptree: the fruit has been used as a substitute for hops in flavoring beer (Faara, 1995).
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  • leaves and developing flower clusters, spring

    leaves and developing flower clusters, spring

  • plant habit, flowering

    plant habit, flowering

  • leaves and flower clustsers

    leaves and flower clustsers

  • flowers

    flowers

  • leaf

    leaf

  • plant habit, summer

    plant habit, summer

  • fruit and leaves

    fruit and leaves

  • plant habit, fall

    plant habit, fall

  • fruit and leaf, fall

    fruit and leaf, fall

  • stems, bark

    stems, bark