Encelia farinosa
Common name: 
Brittlebush
Inceinso
Goldenhills
Pronunciation: 
en-SEE-lee-uh far-ih-NOH-suh
Family: 
Asteraceae
Genus: 
Type: 
Broadleaf
Native to (or naturalized in) Oregon: 
No
  • Perennial drought-deciduous shrub, to 3-5 ft (0.9-1.5 m) tall, woody base, much branched rounded form; stems brittle and covered with fine white hairs, fragrant.  Leaves alternate, simple, crowded at the ends of stems, gray-green, oblong, lanceolate, 2-8 cm long; covered with fine gray or white hairs.  Flowers are yellow, sometimes purple-brown, daisy-like, 3-4 cm wide, in open clusters at the ends of stems and above the leaves.  Fruit is a small achene, 3-6 mm.
  • Sun, needs light, well-drained soil.  More or less restricted to climates with long periods of limited moisture.
  • Hardy to USDA Zone 7   Native to Arizona, Nevada, southwestern Utah, and the interior valleys of coastal southern California, Baja California and northwestern Mexico.  It is now found in Hawaii, but not native.  In its range, it is a dominant shrub forming extensive monospecific stands.  There are three recognized varieties.
  • farinosa: mealy or powdery.
  • Brittlebush:  stems are brittle.    Incienso:  resin that exudes from its stems can be burned as incense.
Click image to enlarge
  • in habitat, flowering

    in habitat, flowering

  • in a landscape, flowering

    in a landscape, flowering

  • leaves

    leaves

  • flower

    flower