Nerium oleander
Common name: 
Oleander
Nerium
Pronunciation: 
NE-ri-um o-lee-AN-der
Family: 
Apocynaceae
Genus: 
Type: 
Broadleaf
Native to (or naturalized in) Oregon: 
No
  • Broadleaf evergreen shrub to small tree, to 6-12 ft tall and a similar spread.  Leaves are opposite or in whorls of 3-4, thick and leathery, dark or grayish green, narrow lanceolate, 7.5-20 cm long and 1-4 cm wide.  Flower are in terminal clusters and are white, pink, red, purple,  to copper and orange, each is 2.5-5 cm wide with 5 petals. The fruit is a slender pod about 15 cm long, which splits open a maturity to release many downy seeds.
  • Sun to partial shade, withstands dry conditions. Well adapted to coastal areas.   It is commonly used in highway median strip plantings in California and Texas.
  • Hardy to USDA Zone 8         The species is currently wide spread and it is difficult to determine a precise region of origin.  It is considered native through the Mediterranean region, to the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East, to India and central China.
  • Oleander has historically been considered a poisonous plant.  It contains cardiac glycosides, which are known to be toxic when ingested.  These and other poisons are found in all parts of the plant, whether dried or green. Ingestion oleander plant parts can lead to serious illness and possibly death.
Click image to enlarge
  • plant habit, in a container

    plant habit, in a container

  • foliage

    foliage

  • foliage

    foliage

  • leaves and small flower cluster

    leaves and small flower cluster

  • flower

    flower